Archery Learning Center: 3D distance estimation?????? - Archery Learning Center

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3D distance estimation??????

#1   ausie

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Posted 22 March 2006 - 03:16 AM

As I shoot mainly field I find distance estimation difficult, I manage to pickup the odd trophy at unmarked shoots but I am rarely confident about the distance. When I have asked how people do their estimation I have come across quite a few different methods but most just guess. So how do you do it on 3D and unmarked Paper??????????
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#2   JAY

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Posted 22 March 2006 - 07:28 AM

I got a 5 yard piece of PVC lay it in front of me & look @ that & flip it in my mind for every 5 yards . it burns a
image in your brain after awhile ! :blink:
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#3   Shuter

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Posted 22 March 2006 - 07:39 AM

I got a 5 yard piece of PVC lay it in front of me & look @ that & flip it in my mind for every 5 yards . it burns a
image in your brain after awhile ! :blink:

I do about the same thing, but in 10 yard chunks (5 might be better). After TONS of practice ranging everything from mailboxes to neighbors' cars (and barking dogs!) I have become pretty good at it. I measured 10 yards off before and just kept looking at it. It DOES kind of burn itself into your brain after a while.
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#4   shootin4fun

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Posted 22 March 2006 - 09:41 AM

I try to find something 1/2 the distance of the target and guess that yardage first. If it is long yardage I may break it down a couple of times. Most of the time distance from 1-20 yards can be guessed pretty accurately, so if there is something at the half way point that is 17 yards, you can judge the target for 34 yards.
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#5   3rdplace

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Posted 22 March 2006 - 11:11 AM

This was an article I wrote to help some beginning archers in our area I hope it might be of some help to you.







YARDAGE ESTIMATION
By Michael Marlow



Consistent yardage estimation in 3-D archery is perhaps the single most important part of the game, yet the least practiced. Most archers enjoy shooting the bow because of the dynamic feeling of accomplishment when they hit a dot the size of a Quarter at 40 yards. They spend hours honing their form by relentlessly pounding the practice target with hundreds of arrows. But when the time comes for yardage practice they only spend a few minutes because itís not as exciting as shooting at and hitting that dot. To be successful at the 3-D game an archer must sacrifice some of the excitement of shooting and spend as much time or more practicing yardage estimation.

Every archer needs a starting point to judge from. I like starting at 20 yards and counting in five-yard increments along the ground to the target. This works well on flat ground but creates problems in hilly terrain because you see more ground from an elevated shooting position. On ranges that are sloping downhill from the shooter stake it is better to reference your yardage off of trees horizontally along your line of sight. I find one that is close to 20 and start estimating to the next tree from there.

The easiest way to find a starting point is to use a distance that is already familiar to you. This can be the length of your house or the distance from your parking place to the door of your house. For example, if your house is 54 feet long you know that is 18 yards. When you are at the stake visualize where your house would end if you were standing at the opposite end. This gives you a point to start from that is already fixed into your psyche and you didnít even know it. Another way of ingraining a starting point is to exclusively shoot at a target at a known distance. Set a target at 25 or 30 yards and practice only from that distance. After a while you will be able to picture where your practice target would be compared to where the tournament target is.

After you find your starting spot find a way that is comfortable to estimate the remaining distance. Use five or ten yard increments from where your starting point is to the target or count back from the target to where your beginning point is.
Many shooters use the halfway method. They find the point that is halfway between you and the target, reference it to the known distance you already know and then double it. An easy way to find the midpoint is to spread your feet apart the same distance as the targetís feet are spaced. Then visualize a line from your right foot to the targets left foot and a line from your left foot to the targets right foot. Where the lines intersect should be the halfway point between you and the target. If you use this method try to get within a half yard with your estimate so that when you double it you donít double a mistake in your estimate.

Probably the best, and most expensive, way to learn how to learn to judge yardage is to use ďhead yardage.Ē This is simply memorizing the targets at different distances. Since this method takes terrain out of the equation it is probably the most consistent way to estimate. This is why it is an expensive way to learn since you need to own all the targets that you will shoot or have access to them. An inexpensive way to get the full benefit of this technique is to cut life-sized replicas from cardboard and set them at known distances. Use distances you normally see in a tournament.

The methods listed above are primary ways to estimate yardage. Donít forget to use other tools that help in your judging. Learn the distances you can clearly see the twelve, ten and eight rings. Use this to estimate the farthest possible distance the target can be from you. If you can clearly see the twelve at 15 yards and the ten at 22 yards and the eight at 30 yards then you can reasonably estimate a range that the target falls between. An example would be a target set at 25 yards you would be able to see the eight ring clearly but not the ten. So you would know the target is between 22 and 30 yards. You will need to practice this in varying shades of light. The brighter it is the better you can see the scoring rings.

Know yourself and how you judge; what I mean is know how you judge in the open in relationship to thick tight ranges. In the open I tend to judge three yards short. In a tunnel situation I will judge two yards long. If the target is partially hidden behind a tree I will judge two yards long. Learn your tendencies and compensate for them on the range.

Use what you have to judge with. A few years ago I was shooting the Second Leg of the IBO Southern Triple Crown and was confronted with a wolf target at 45 yards. The target was set over a rolling hill, which obstructed about half the ground to the target. I could only see the wolf from the belly up. The trail was cut through open pines and had a generous amount of sagebrush growing underneath which worked to my advantage. When the trail was cut there was a perfect wall of grass on both sides. Since I couldnít see the ground I used the wall of grass to count my yardage on and hung a ten. I have also used my chair to get a better view of the ground in the same situation. By standing on the seat you can gain another 15 inches in height.

Take note of the light. If the Sun is behind you and shining on the target the target will appear closer because you see more detail. If the Sun is behind the target you will find the opposite to be true since the part facing you will be in the shade.

Most importantly listen to your subconscious. If that little voice keeps telling you something is wrong with your number, take a little extra time and maybe use a different style of estimating to check your number. Use some of the checks described above and nail that ten ring.
Mike Marlow
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#6   Target Tony

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 05:43 AM

buying a laser range finder and going out on our local park trails and woods is how i practice. plus with it not only being great exercise, it helps with estimating hilly distances and ravines.
i also keep a log book on my estimates and beside it the real distance. that way i can see myself getting better and better. i also play a game at the end of the range estimation session. i say i have to nail within 1 yard 5 in a row before i can go home.

Shoot Strong
Tony
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