Archery Learning Center: Interview with Braden Gellenthien - Archery Learning Center

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Interview with Braden Gellenthien Current World Indoor Champion shares his thoughts

#1   GRIV

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 03:07 PM



Have you always shot archery? When did you start?

I didnít shoot my first arrow until I was 10 years old. I was at a Cub Scout camp and was excited for three activities; swimming, shooting a BB gun, and archery. I remember the first arrow I ever shot out of that old, beat-up recurve went sailing way over the target. I was anything but a natural. We shot at about 10 yards, and I was impressed by the ďbigĒ kids consistently hitting 8s and better on a 122 cm face. Even though I wasnít very good, I enjoyed the battle with myself to try and improve. After camp was over, I began nagging my parents to get me a bow so that I could keep shooting. Luckily, after several very convincing conversations with my parentsÖ letís be honest, I was 10, so it was more like whiningÖ they gave in.

I started shooting locally in a JOAD program and began competing in state-wide shoots. After winning a few state championships by the time I was 14, I started thinking I was a top-gun. In reality, I was a trigger-punching fool who couldnít break 290 on an NFAA round; but I didnít know any better. Then, I reached a turning point in my shooting. I heard that Terry Wunderle was holding a seminar at our local range, and decided to go to it to show him what I could do. Within the first 20 minutes of the seminar, he had us up shooting so he could see what he was working with. As he came up behind me, I bear down and focused on hitting the X. Ok, hit my anchor, pin was in the middle, I placed my finger on the trigger, and WHAP! It went right in there and I thought, ďway to go! I bet you impressed him.Ē He shrugged and said, ďYouíve got limited life, youíll be done in 3 months.Ē I thought, ďIíll be able to do this forever, he doesnít know what heís talking about.Ē

Sure enough, 3 months after the course, I had the worst case of target panic and was about to give up shooting. One of the local pros gave me an old back-tension release to try, and instantly, the target panic was gone. Soon after, I called Terry on the phone to apologize for the way I had acted at his seminar, and asked if he would consider coaching me. Luckily, he was quick to forgive, and by the end of the week I had sent him a video tape and was making changes to my form. Within a few weeks, I was shooting 300 with 52-55X and had a trip scheduled to visit him at his house.

We worked on my mental game before ever shooting an arrow, and when I finally shot my bow at his 20 yard indoor range, my first 60 arrows landed in the X. That day, I realized that archery was something I wanted to do for the rest of my life.

What made you decide to turn pro?

There was no real, single, moment where I consciously decided that I wanted to be a pro. During my second year shooting FITA, Terry and I had a discussion about USAT. I decided I wanted to try and become the youngest male to make Senior USAT, so I started shooting all of the tournaments in the Senior division. In my second FITA shoot, the Texas Shootout, I won the Olympic Round and realized ďhey, I CAN hang with these guys.Ē I started practicing harder and more often, and went out to the World Team Trials with hopes of gaining experience to help me in the future. At the end of the tournament, I found myself to have made the final spot on the team and went to compete in New York City in the FITA World Championships in 2003.

I guess the World Championship week could be when I realized I was able to compete with the pros. I spent the week practicing and shooting with Dave Cousins, and we had a day on the practice field for the record books. We went down in the morning and decided to shoot a full FITA before it got too crowded. We started off at 90, and rocked it; 343 for me, 346 for Dave. We went to 70 and found a bale with a guy from the Phillipines. End one; 60-60. End two; 120-120. End three; 180-179. That guy left the bale so quick! 70m went even better than 90m did; I scored a 358 and Dave shot a 357. The momentum I gained from this single day of shooting helped carry me to placing 3rd at my first World Championship.

This could be considered the turning point in my career when my thoughts went from ďit would be nice to shoot for a livingĒ to ďI COULD shoot for a living.Ē

What does being an archery pro mean to you?

Being an archery pro means a lot more than just shooting impressive scores. Looking back, I remember meeting several pros who were just hot-shots and didnít give other people the time of day. Even though I was jealous of their shooting abilities, their attitudes left me rather unimpressed. I try and make myself as available as possible at the local range to help people with their equipment, form, and any other questions they may have. I also see myself in a role-model position, so I do the best that I can to relate to the youth archers and keep them interested in the sport.

One thing about being a pro that sometimes gives us a bad rap is when weíre at a tournament and someone comes up to talk and we act coldly. Most often, weíre not trying to be a pain, itís just that weíre focused on what weíre there to do and we need to be in a state like this to do our best. Itís our job to perform while weíre at the tournaments, and sometimes stopping to have a conversation or answer an equipment question can be very distracting.



What advice do you have for upcoming shooters who are on the fence to becoming pro, or think that they are not good enough to shoot with the pros?

Youíre never going to know youíre not good enough unless you try. The main thing that separates the top level pros from the average shooter is their drive and control over their emotions. Thereís a fine line that every one of us needs to toe in order to balance our focus and intensity. When an archer finds this balance, thatís the moment they find themselves ďable to hang with the pros.Ē And of course, there is no substitute to competing in professional level tournaments. Get out there, give it a try, and if things donít work out for the best, use that experience as extra drive to train for the next challenge.



What is your ďtake homeĒ from archery competition? Why do you do it?

At the end of the day, I shoot because I like the challenge. Every day I challenge myself to be perfect in my shot sequence and execution. When I succeed in tournaments, thereís a monetary incentive. When I succeed at the range, I gain confidence in myself and my form that will help me the next time I find myself in a real pressure-filled situation. On a more personal note, the most amazing feeling Iíve ever had in archery is after winning a World Championship or World Cup event. Standing up on that podium, and hearing the Star-Spangled Banner playing while the USA flag is being raised to the top is something that always brings a tear to my eye. That moment is why I shoot.

Can you give us a short rundown of your wins and most favorite accomplishments in archery?

3rd place at the World Championships in 2003 (New York City)
1st place at the Lancaster shoot in 2004
1st place at NFAA Nationals 2006
1st place at the Indoor World Championships 2007
Cleaning all 3 NFAA tournaments in 2008



You dad isnít a competitor, but he is always there backing you. What role does he play in your archery?

Early in my career, he was definitely my enabler hahaha. He helped me fund tournaments and maintain my equipment. Even though he doesnít shoot, heís learned quite a bit about archery over the years and, until recently, has been my ďarrow technician.Ē Heís traveled a lot with me because he enjoys watching me shoot and I needed his help renting cars and booking hotel rooms when I was younger.

What shoots are on your MUST ATTEND list? Why?

NAA Trials, Lancaster, Vegas, NAA Indoor Nationals, Indoor Worlds, Arizona Cup, Texas Shootout, Outdoor Trials, Dakota Archery Classic, Gold Cup, NFAA Outdoor Nationals, Outdoor Worlds, NAA Outdoor Nationals, and the World Cup shoots.

Iím sure there are a few more that Iím missing in there, but this is a quick run-down of all the shoots that I donít plan on missing this coming season. They include the stuff for NAA, NFAA, and also FITA, which are the three major circuits that I shoot.



You have a great bow arm. Did you emphasize that during training or did it just happen?

Thatís the one thing that Terry emphasizes most about form. The bow arm is the most important aspect (other than the aim) of the shot. If you break left, youíll hit left. If you collapse, that arrowís going low and right. I emphasized strengthening my arm and the actual bow arm during and after execution to make it the most forgiving and accurate that I could. After that, itís all about shot duplication and I created my form around the bow arm so that itís the root of my shot.
Don't over think it; you just might outsmart yourself :)

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#2   GRIV

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 03:10 PM





Your stance is a closed-ďishĒ style. Not many pros use a closed style stance. Can you tell us what brought you to that style and why it works for you?

With a neutral stance my bow arm naturally breaks left. Itís my bodyís way of responding to the shock of the shot, or anything for that matter. Even when I used to play baseball, I needed to close my stance so that I did not open my chest up early and pull the ball foul. So naturally, I had to do the same for archery to keep that bow arm going ďstraight at the target.Ē In order to build my shot around that perfect bow arm, I needed to close my stance to achieve it. This has made the closed stance as the first step in my shot sequence.



You use a forward facing side rod, and your setup seems to be very forward balanced. What do you like about this feel and how did you arrive at this point?

Iíd like to be able to say there is some profound reason for the forward-facing side rod, but itís actually there because of the aggressiveness of my bow arm. With the weight of the side rod and the speed at which my bow falls forward, I was hitting my arm on the follow-through with the side rod in its normal place. I moved it forward, and I stopped hitting my forearm with the side rod.
I also really like front weight on my bow, so by having the side rod out the front, I get the front weight of both the side rod and the sight. With the side rod to the back, it neutralizes the front weight of the sight. So, by putting the side rod forward, I get twice the forward weight as the guy who puts his side rod to the back.



Your follow through seems to be very consistently shaped. Your ďpull throughĒ the shot is very evident. What is your procedure, or checklist that you stick to while shooting? Can you give us a peek into your shot routine?

Alright, all of this happens really quickly and I donít consciously go through every step as itís become memory, but here goes:

  • I come to the line and set up with the closed stance.
  • I pull out the arrow, nock it, and clasp my release onto the string.
  • At this point, I look up and focus on the target.
  • I concentrate on the conditions (when outdoors), determine where Iím going to aim, and visualize making the shot.
  • Now I raise my arm and draw, keeping focus on the target, and sometimes the flag when outdoors (to make any adjustments I may need to my aiming point).
  • When I raise my arm, I ďpre-loadĒ it. I have a lot of push built in as I begin the draw.
  • Next, I move my hand into my anchor; placing the groove between my index and middle fingers at the corner of my jaw.
  • I settle in, focus through the peep, and place the pin in the middle of the target.
  • Now, instead of focusing on keeping the pin there, I focus on minimizing movement in my bow arm. Forward movement is ok, but I try to steady my shot.
  • Now, the next part changes whether Iím using a trigger or back-tension. With a trigger, I place my thumb on the button and begin increasing pressure with my back until it breaks. With the back-tension, I start moving my elbow down and back while allowing the release to roll.


A lot of people see my release really rotating and think that Iím using my fingers to activate the release. While yes, my fingers are moving, the real pull is happening too. I find that I aim better with more movement in the release, so thatís why itís there.
Don't over think it; you just might outsmart yourself :)

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#3   GRIV

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 03:11 PM



That looks like a trippy 600 or 599!

You canít shoot them in there like that without a good arrow recipe. Did you just cut them and put the points in, or did you work at getting them just right? Whatís your tuning procedure for indoors, and how do you get your arrows to shoot like that!?

Honestly, with the 2712s, I got lucky. I cut off a few inches, threw in some heavy points, adjusted my sight to where I thought it would be, and I actually hit a super ten on the first shot. I rolled through the round and shot a 600 with the first 60 arrows out of the bow.

For the 2312s, Iíve got the arrow recipe down. I just used archerís advantage to set up the stiffness on the stiff side of the green and went from there. I just eyeball tune the rest to get it close, shoot it through paper to make sure the arrows arenít coming out sideways. At this point, I back up to 20 yards and group tune. Group tuning is the one thing I spend a lot of time doing. I donít care if Iím shooting a perfect bullet-hole or have a slight tear. What matters is what the arrows are doing 20 yards or 18m down range. Normally, I shoot two arrows at a spot and gauge what the ďgroupĒ looks like. I make subtle adjustments to my rest until I hear that ďCRACKKKĒ Iím looking for. Once Iíve got two arrows hitting the exact same hole, Iíll go down, pull them, and shoot another to make sure itís hitting. After that, I take note of the measurements and have it for the rest of the season.




What is your mental approach indoors? What advice can you give to shooters looking to do well indoors?


My mental approach for indoors is the pursuit of perfection. I work on intensifying my focus to be able to shoot through anything. Indoor archery is all about duplication and beyond that, all that matters is your mental approach.
My advice for shot duplication starts out with making that one perfect shot that drills the super ten. Once youíve got that, think about what made that shot different from the others that you normally make. Now, focus on doing it again. If it didnít work the second time, what did you do differently? Concentrate on the feeling of the shot and how it changes with the little different things that you do. Make a shot sequence, and make it foolproof. This is what youíll fall back on when you get into a tournament situation, and it needs to be simple so you remember it and can duplicate it no matter what. Remember everything about your shot. Thatís what practice is about; learning about you and your shot.



Your concentration on the game is clear. Can you give us a look into your mental preparations leading up to a big shoot? For instance, are you an incremental goal setter, do you set goals for over all performance over the year, or do you focus on one major milestone and let all the other shoots fall in where they may?

I try not to change my training regiment as a big tournament gets closer. Every time I shoot an arrow in practice, Iím trying my hardest to hit a 10. Every shot is a learning experience, and the moment I find myself ďjust flinging them,Ē I stop. As the tournament draws nearer, I focus more and try to learn the tendencies in my shot as it falls apart. I can miss in practice and not have any repercussions. The goal is to discover what goes wrong when I make a bad shot so that I can notice it in the future BEFORE I make the bad shot. I create certain points in my shot where I have an ďAbortĒ button. If I feel that little something out of place, the shotís over, and I start again.

As far as goal setting, I try not to set goals for individual tournaments. My goal is to shoot perfect shots and score perfectly too. I donít set score goals or placement goals, but I focus on shooting that perfect shot. I know that any weekend, if I go out and shoot 90-95% perfect shots (unless weíre indoors) that my score will be right up there. I canít control what the other guys do, so worrying about placement is just a stupid waste of time, and outdoor FITA has taught me that no score should ever be taken for granted. The only thing I can rely on out there is me, so my goals are based on me and my personal performance.



Now Tell us about the Boston hatÖ Iíve seen you wear those things until they are faded and thread bare. Is it just love for baseball, a cool looking ďBĒ, or a high score inducing superstition? Do you have any pregame ritual, superstitions, or habits that you take care of before hitting the floor?

I love my Red Sox. I rock the hat to represent my hometown, and it has become bit of a trademark. Other than the hat, Iím getting away from rituals or superstitions. I used to have a few, but I realized I was limiting myself. I felt I could ďonlyĒ do well if I did those things, and if I couldnít, Iíd be worried Iíd screw up. The only superstition I have left isnít really one. When Iím walking up for a finals match in FITA, or a shoot-off in the NFAA, I keep my head up, chin straight, and stand up tall. I look forward, through anything Iím looking at. I focus deeply, and it helps me relax.

Give us a rundown of all the gear you depend on for your shooting. What are you bow specs? Accessories? Etc. Donít hesitate to shout-out to the sponsors.

First off, I shoot a Hoyt. For the past few years, Iíve been shooting the Pro-Elite with xt2000 limbs at 45 lbs for indoors, 58 for outdoors. This year, however; Iím looking forward to getting my hands on the Vantage Elite. I run Easton 2312s for FITA and am toying around with some 2712s for NFAA stuff. I shoot Scott releases and a CBE sight. Iíve got 6 stainless steel dawg weights on the end of my Doinker stabilizer, and Iím running a 6x Specialty Archery Super Scope 1 3/8Ē on my sight. I make my own strings and am in the process of creating my own company with the help of Steve Stark, so be on the lookout for some posts later this month!

You have one bow that looks like itís your ďold trustyĒ. How important do you think it really is to stick with one bow, one style, and live with it for years?

Iíve got two sticks that have been my ďold trusty.Ē While Iím not advocating this for everyone, these bows were home for me. No matter what, they drilled 10s. I stayed in my comfort zone and never really gave another bow a chance; until this summer. I took plenty of time and set up a new 2008 bow the right way and took it out to Colorado Springs for NAA Nationals. Everyone was asking me what had happened to my 2004 bow; nothing did, it just got replaced. The most important part of having a bow you believe in is setting it up to fit you. Beyond that; donít be like me and avoid change. Iím learning slowly, and will be rocking all new 2009 equipment this coming year.

When you break down a bow and get it set up for outdoors, what kind of setup do you do? What tuning procedures do you perform? Which ones do you do if there is time, but not always?

My outdoor tuning process isnít much different than my indoor tuning at all. First, I eyeball it to get it close, shoot it through paper to verify it. Then, I put a dot at the top of my target and shoot it at about 10 yards. Then, I back up to 40 yards and shoot at that dot, without moving my sight. The goal is to get your arrow to hit directly below the first arrow. If the arrow doesnít hit directly below, I make changes to my rest left and right until the arrow does hit directly below. After each change, itís important to start over at 10 yards again. Once this is done, I back up to 70m and group tune. I move the rest to tune out up and down movement and use draw weight to tune out my left and rights.

If you experience a dip in average or score, what do you do to get back on track? Do you have a set procedure or do you ferret out the problem and drill it until itís fixed?

Blank bale. We all hit highs and lows in our shooting, and when I hit mine, I revert back to shooting blank bale. At this point, Iím just working on form. Normally when I lose my shot, itís because I have been focusing on hitting the ten-ring too much and have focused less on my form. Once I can ďfeelĒ that perfect shot again, Iíll go back to shooting a target and scoring. Iím also very stubborn and will shoot all day if Iím struggling. The reason being is that I canít leave the range knowing Iím having trouble. I need to figure it all out before I can convince myself to call it a day. I try to always leave the range on a perfectly executed shot that drills the ten so that that positive reinforcement stays with me until the next time that I shoot.



It isnít hard to find out you love you some fishing. How do you balance archery and fishing? Which one is your first love?

Fishing is something Iíve done with my family since I was old enough to hold a pole. Fishing is relaxing to me and I use it as a getaway from all of the pressures in life. At the same time, archery comes before fishing every time, unless Iím in a rut and need a day off.

You just graduated from college? What are your plans for the future?

I plan on shooting full-time now in addition to working with my string company as I mentioned above. I recently just moved down to Virginia and Iím still getting used to the changes in my life.

You are a world champion, and have excelled in most every game archery has to offer. What are your goals for your future in archery?

I hope to continue being as competitive as I am in NAA, NFAA, and FITA, but would also like to expand my skills into other arenas. Iíve always had fun shooting 3D even though Iím not very good at it. Iíve heard that ASA has a marked division this year, so I may be making it out to a few of those shoots this year too. The area of Virginia that I moved to is also very interested in field archery, so Iím looking forward to getting into that as well.

What are your hopes for the future of professional archery, or archery itself?

The grand plans are for archery to one day become as lucrative of a profession as other professional sports, but weíll have to see about that. Until then, professional archery will be what it is, grinding out tournament placements and contingency to keep up the addiction. One thing that could be done to speed this up to increase tournament entry fees for the pro division. If we all put up $1,000 to shoot a weekend tournament, the purse is going to be a heck of a lot greater. If you look at other sports with buy-ins or tournament fees (poker or golf) those payments are much higher than the ones with archery.

On a lighter note, itís great to see all of the strides that the sport is making in school systems around the US and I really hope to see it continue to grow even more. This increased base of people who have been introduced to the sport will do well to help the sport succeed functionally and monetarily in the future.
Don't over think it; you just might outsmart yourself :)

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#4   ScottyD

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 03:39 PM

Terrific interview, he is a very well spoken bloke. Its interesting to note that he tries to get his practice sessions finished with a bit of resolution, be it a positive shot or conquoring a form problem...something i think i might try for a while!

Great read :Applause:
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#5   GRIV

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 03:50 PM

Terrific interview, he is a very well spoken bloke. Its interesting to note that he tries to get his practice sessions finished with a bit of resolution, be it a positive shot or conquoring a form problem...something i think i might try for a while!

Great read :Applause:


Totally! I think he did a great job.

Braden will also be checking in from time to time to answer follow-up questions.
Don't over think it; you just might outsmart yourself :)

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#6   Huntelk

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 04:50 PM

Great read for sure! Thanks for taking the time to help us learn.

I'd like to hear you elaborate a little more on this final step.

Once this is done, I back up to 70m and group tune. I move the rest to tune out up and down movement and use draw weight to tune out my left and rights.

What are your arrows doing and what correction do you make for a certain undesireable impact point?
The better you are at what you do, the more you can forget it; the more you forget it, the better you can do it.
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#7   Braden

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 05:15 PM

Great read for sure! Thanks for taking the time to help us learn.

I'd like to hear you elaborate a little more on this final step.

Once this is done, I back up to 70m and group tune. I move the rest to tune out up and down movement and use draw weight to tune out my left and rights.

What are your arrows doing and what correction do you make for a certain undesireable impact point?



I'm sorry for not elaborating more on this during the actual interview. Basically, when I'm group tuning, I go back to 70 meters and just unload my quiver. I shoot between 12-15 arrows at the dot and get an overall idea of what my group looks like. If my group is too wide left and right, I'll adjust the weight in order to tighten the group to a more desirable width, and if the group has too much high-low variance, I'll adjust the height of the rest to work that out.

At this point, I actually find it easier to NOT be sighted in. You're only trying to get an idea for what your group looks like... Normally, when I'm group tuning, my impact is somewhere out in the red/blue areas... and it moves with each end as I make adjustments. It's important to keep a log with each adjustment that you make and your overall impression of the group that the adjustment resulted in. This way, you'll get a better understanding of how these changes affect you, in particular. We all know how things are supposed to behave in theory, but let's face it, rarely does everything work in real-life the way it should in the book.

Best of luck!
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#8   wolfface

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 05:54 PM

Great atricle Braden and thanks for putting in the time to do this for us. I have always loved watching you shoot, emulating (spelling?) your form you always look strong focused and relaxed.

I love see your emotion after a shot, good or bad, you definatly keep archery exciting to watch.

I not sure, I think you mentioned in an article somewhere about your bent bow arm, and bringing the tricep into play? can you explain this a little more.

You also mentioned about when the shot breaks and and low right misses (Which I am getting every now and then) would pulling through the shot help this?

Thanks for your time, Tyson
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#9   Mr. October

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 05:57 PM

Braden .. you shooting the FITA East next weekend?
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#10   JBA

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 06:53 PM

Hi Braden, thanks for your time and for sharing your experience with us.
After reading the interview thereīs something that has caught my attention....you say that you shoot 45# indoors and 58# outdoors. Thatīs a big difference also in holding weight. Do you make any other changes in your set up to compensate that difference? Any special reason for that big difference in draw weight?
Thanks again,
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#11   thndrr

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 09:37 PM

excellent info Braden. Thanks for sharing with us !
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#12   Bob_Looney

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 09:53 PM

Thanks for the interview and insight guys. very much appreciated.
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#13   Daniel Boone

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 12:15 AM

I remember the first time I saw this youngman shoot. It was my first time to see indoor nationals on that scale. Braden was shooting in the youth division at KC Indoor nationals. I took a youth to this event and he took seventh. I was in awe of his shooting ability. I ask Terry Wuderdale who is this youngman was. Terry said he one if the best I have ever coached. Now that there was enough for me to know this youngman was special. Thanks for sharing your input with all of us. Good luck in the future.
DB
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#14   phil knall

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 04:10 AM

Great job on the interview, guys!
It's always great to hear about pros' views on practice routines, tuning etc... And then seeing what of it I can copy to improve my shooting personally.
Watching Braden shoot is always humbling and inspiring at the same time.
Looking forward to reading more as the questions roll in!
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#15   EGriggs

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 12:08 PM

Nice interview.

The first time I met Braden and his Dad was at the NAA Indoor Nationals in Andover, MA (in 2001 I think). I didn't shoot a whole lot of NAA, so I had never even heard of this kid before (even though as it turned out he only lived 20 minutes from me), but I was completely amazed with how well he was shooting. I knew watching him that day that he was going the be "the stuff". I couldn't even tell you how many times we shot together practicing after that day, but something strange started happening.... It seemed like every time we shot he came closer and closer to beating me and then we would tie a bunch and before I knew it, it was all I could do to hang with the little punk...lol. It's been a great pleasure to watch Braden grow and mature from that little kid who had "game" that day in Andover to the great archer and fine young man he's become today.
Eric Griggs
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#16   x-ring

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 12:13 PM

Great interview Griv and Braden. Archery freaks like myself eat this stuff up.

Braden -

One quick question for you concerning poundage... Why the difference in indoor and outdoor poundage? It seems most people keep at the same poundage for everything, yet you shoot 45lbs indoors do you compensate with cable size to keep a higher holding weight or do you just call it good with having a lightweight indoor rig and heavier outdoor rig?

Thanks again guys great stuff.
Keep 'em in the middle,
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#17   I BOW 2

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 01:29 PM

C'mon Braden hurry up and answer Jon's question I want to fix my bow tonight! ;>)

Also when you "weight" adjust your 70m group for left / right do you add draw weight to close the group or just experiment in both weight directions until it gets better? Ken
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#18   JBA

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 01:47 PM

Great interview Griv and Braden. Archery freaks like myself eat this stuff up.

Braden -

One quick question for you concerning poundage... Why the difference in indoor and outdoor poundage? It seems most people keep at the same poundage for everything, yet you shoot 45lbs indoors do you compensate with cable size to keep a higher holding weight or do you just call it good with having a lightweight indoor rig and heavier outdoor rig?

Thanks again guys great stuff.


Hi Jon,
you didnīt read the whole thread, did you? :lol: :lol: ;)
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#19   x-ring

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 02:14 PM

Hi Jon,
you didnīt read the whole thread, did you? :lol: :lol: ;)



Yes I actually did read the whole thread....nowhere does Braden say why he uses a lower poundage indoors and I was curious as to if he compensates for the lower poundage with a higher holding weight. Maybe my question wasn't clear.

Braden - Are you shooting higher poundage for the 27's?
Keep 'em in the middle,
>>>---Jon--->
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#20   JBA

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 02:33 PM

Yes I actually did read the whole thread....nowhere does Braden say why he uses a lower poundage indoors and I was curious as to if he compensates for the lower poundage with a higher holding weight. Maybe my question wasn't clear.

Braden - Are you shooting higher poundage for the 27's?


Hi Jon,
Just kidding :) . Thatīs the very same question I did a couple post before.
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